2013 College Basketball Tournament: Best of the Big East

Results from the Big East Basketball Tournament Simulation

1
16
'99 UConn
'09 Villanova
83
81
8
9
'87 Syracuse
'89 Seton Hall
104
103
4
13
'04 UConn
'09 UConn
76
72
5
12
'11 UConn
'85 St. John's
71
81
3
14
'03 Syracuse
'10 W. Virginia
73
82
6
11
'85 Villanova
'96 Syracuse
73
76
7
10
'85 Georgetown
'82 Georgetown
80
71
2
15
'84 Georgetown
'07 Georgetown
78
65
1
8
'99 UConn
'87 Syracuse
4
12
'04 UConn
'85 St. John's
14
11
'10 W. Virginia
'96 Syracuse
7
2
'85 Georgetown
'84 Georgetown

WhatIfSports.com is celebrating the Big East's rich history of hardwood prowess. Its members have claimed 18 NCAA Tournament Final Four appearances since the conference's inception in 1979.

Utilizing our award-winning college basketball simulation engine, we "played" a tournament featuring every Big East squad that has advanced to the Final Four. Beginning with two play-in games, we simulated each match-up 1,001 times and advanced the winner. View play-in game results and learn about seeding here.

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1998-99 Connecticut Huskies
2008-09 Villanova Wildcats
1
16
'99 UConn
'09 Villanova
83
81
1998-99 Connecticut: Jim Calhoun's first national championship team was perhaps his best. The Huskies were coming off an Elite 8 run and a 32-5 season. Better yet, the starting five returned, headlined by Richard Hamilton, the reigning Big East Player of the Year. UConn cruised to the Big East regular-season and tournament championships, with Hamilton again earning Player of the Year honors, before entering the NCAA Tournament with a 28-2 record and a No. 1 seed. The Huskies advanced through the tournament, ousting Gonzaga to reach the school's first Final Four, and then dispatching Ohio State to set a Finals matchup with one-loss Duke. With a 77-74 upset victory, Connecticut became the first school since Texas Western in 1966 to win a championship in its first Final Four appearance. Hamilton, who scored 27 points in the title game, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

2008-09 Villanova: The Wildcats were heavy on experience, returning all but one player from the previous season's Sweet 16 run. Forward Dante Cunningham led the squad in scoring and rebounding, averaging 16.1 points and 7.5 boards per game while winning the Big East's Most Improved Player award. Junior guard Scottie Reynolds chipped in 15.2 points per game and a team-high 3.4 assists, while sophomore guard Corey Fisher, the Big East's Sixth Man Award winner, scored 10.8 points per game. Villanova was awarded the No. 3 seed in the East Region of the NCAA Tournament and dispatched American, UCLA and Duke before meeting No. 1-seed Pittsburgh in the Regional Final. A Reynolds layup with two seconds remaining notched a 78-76 victory over the Panthers and advanced the Wildcats to the school's fourth Final Four and first since 1985. The following round, Villanova fell to eventual-champ North Carolina.

-Jake Westrich

Game recap

Villanova's reward for knocking off 2011-12 Louisville in our play-in game? A date with top-seeded UConn in the Round of 16.

The Huskies featured Khalid El-Amin often in the early going. After connecting with Hamilton for an assist, El-Amin scored the Huskies' next 11 points, including three triples. Despite the hot hand, the Wildcats kept pace until the last few minutes of the half, when a three-pointer by Albert Mouring and a tip-in by Jake Voskuhl ensured a seven-point halftime cushion for UConn.

Despite closing the gap during the second half, Villanova was never able to catch UConn. Two treys from Dwayne Anderson in the game's waning moments produced a respectable final score, but the Huskies prevailed 83-81.

A quick glance at the box score would suggest Hamilton and El-Amin, who combined for 48 points, were the catalysts behind UConn's win. But the inside dirty work from Kevin Freeman and Voskuhl was just as important. The pair pulled down 21 rebounds collectively and helped the Huskies to a 44-26 edge on the glass.

Anderson paced the Wildcats with 24 points. Reynolds added 12 points and six assists, while Cunningham scored 12 and collected eight boards.

Player of the game: Richard Hamilton (30 points)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '99 UConn 62.0% - '09 Villanova 38.0%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '99 UConn 79.6 - '09 Villanova 75.9

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '99 UConn vs. '09 Villanova
1986-87 Syracuse Orangemen
1988-89 Seton Hall Pirates
8
9
'87 Syracuse
'89 Seton Hall
104
103
1986-87 Syracuse: With a roster that featured three future NBA regulars, Syracuse was heavy on talent during the 1986-87 season. Sophomore point guard Sherman Douglas led the team in scoring and assists, averaging 17.3 points and 7.6 dimes. Douglas later became the first collegiate to record 2,000 career points and 900 career assists prior to his selection in the second round of the 1989 NBA Draft. Down low, junior Rony Seikaly posted averages of 15.1 points and 8.2 rebounds while teaming with freshman Derrick Coleman (11.9 points, 8.8 boards) to form a beefy front line. Seikaly was drafted ninth in 1988, while Coleman was the first overall pick of the 1990 draft. But before their NBA careers began, the three players formed the nucleus of a squad that won the Big East regular-season championship and advanced to the Finals of the NCAA Tournament. In the National Championship, the Orangemen held a one-point lead over Bob Knight's Indiana Hoosiers, but Keith Smart hit a jumper from the corner with just seconds left to defeat Syracuse 74-73.

1988-89 Seton Hall: When P.J. Carlesimo first assumed the head coaching duties at Seton Hall in 1982, the team finished with a 6-23 record. The next year, the win total climbed to nine and continued to increase steadily during each of Carlesimo's first seven years, culminating during the 1988-89 season when the school won 31 games. That squad, fresh off Seton Hall's first NCAA Tournament appearance the year before, was led by senior guard John Morton, who averaged 17.3 points per game. Distributor Gerald Greene joined him in the backcourt and dished 5.1 assists per contest. The team also featured double-digit scorers Andrew Gaze, Ramon Ramos and Daryll Walker. In the NCAA Tournament, the Pirates knocked off UNLV in the Elite 8, a team that won the NCAA Championship the following season. They then beat Duke in the Final Four, one year before the Blue Devils' run of three consecutive championship game appearances. Despite 35 points from Morton, the Pirates suffered an 80-79 overtime defeat to Glenn Robinson and the Michigan Wolverines in the NCAA Championship.

-Jake Westrich

Game recap

Both 1986-87 Syracuse and 1988-89 Seton Hall lost in the National Championship game during 31-7 seasons. Fitting, then, that the two evenly-matched schools met in the Round of 16 as the eight-vs.-nine pairing.

Defense took a back seat in the matchup, as each school shot better than 50 percent from the field. The Pirates had the upper hand in the first half, but their 10-point cushion dissolved midway through the second half and the teams remained neck-and-neck the rest of the way.

Trailing by four in the game's waning moments, Syracuse clung to slim hopes and the slick shooting of Greg Monroe. The guard drilled a three with nine seconds remaining to bring his team within one. Then, following two made free throws from Seton Hall's Walker, Monroe hit a game-tying three pointer at the buzzer to send the game to overtime.

In the extra stanza, the Orangemen again found themselves trailing. This time, a tip-in by Derek Brower captured the 104-103 lead with 16 seconds remaining. Seton Hall failed to convert from close range and '87 Syracuse advanced with the win.

Douglas scored 26 points and added five steals for the Orangemen, while Monroe converted five treys en route to a 25-point outing. Seikaly and Coleman chipped in 16 and 14 points, respectively, but both fouled out in regulation. Bower played heroically in their absence, notching 12 points and a team-high nine rebounds.

All five starters scored in double figures for the Pirates, led by Morton's 18 points. Greene and Gaze each dished seven dimes in the loss.

Player of the game: Derek Brower (12 points, 9 rebounds, game-winning tip-in)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '87 Syracuse 55.6% - '89 Seton Hall 44.4%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '87 Syracuse 89.5 - '89 Seton Hall 88.1

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '87 Syracuse vs. '89 Seton Hall
2003-04 Connecticut
2008-09 Connecticut
4
13
'04 UConn
'09 UConn
76
72
2003-04 Connecticut: UConn entered the 2003-04 campaign as a title favorite, garnering the preseason No. 1 ranking. Led by juniors Emeka Okafor and Ben Gordon, the Huskies did not disappoint. Jim Calhoun's squad maintained a top-10 ranking throughout the season and entered the NCAA tournament as a No. 2 seed in the Phoenix region. After easily handling their first four opponents, the Huskies met Duke in the Final Four but trailed by seven points at halftime. Okafor led a rally, scoring all 18 of his points in the second half to advance UConn to the championship game with a 79-78 victory. Georgia Tech proved no match two days later and Connecticut captured the school's second National Championship. Okafor, the tournament's Most Outstanding Player, was taken with the second pick of the NBA draft, while Gordon followed one selection later.

2008-09 Connecticut: After beginning the season with an undefeated non-conference record, UConn was put to the test in Big East play, facing nine ranked teams in 18 games, plus another ranked squad, Syracuse, in the Big East tournament. The Orange defeated the Huskies in a six-overtime thriller, but UConn still took a 27-4 record to the NCAA Tournament and received a No. 1 seed. The Huskies' run ultimately ended with a defeat to No. 2 seed Michigan State in the Final Four. Senior guard A.J. Price led the team in points (14.7 per game) and assists (4.7 per game), while post players Hasheem Thabeet and Jeff Adrian combined to average 27.2 points per game on 56 percent shooting and collected 20.7 rebounds per contest. Thabeet rejected 4.6 blocks per game, second-most nationally. He was named the Big East Co-Player of the Year, the Defensive Player of the Year and was selected with the second overall pick in the 2009 NBA Draft.

-Jake Westrich

Game recap

The University of Connecticut placed four teams in the tourney field, but a Round of 16 matchup between two Huskie rosters ensured that no more than three UConn squads could advance to the Elite 8.

The '04 UConn edition kicked things off with a three-pointer from Rashad Anderson and never looked back. The NCAA Tournament champs stretched their lead to as much as 17 points, carrying a 39-23 advantage into halftime.

After the break, '09 UConn finally found some offense, scoring 49 second-half points. Despite trailing by 10 with one minute remaining, the '09 squad cut the deficit to three with 23 seconds left. They got no closer, however, as Taliek Brown hit a free throw and '04 UConn held on for a 76-72 win.

Gordon led his team in the scoring column, netting 20 points in the victory. One intriguing matchup pitted two premier shot blockers, Okafor and Thabeet, against each other, yet neither player led his team in rejections. For '09 UConn, Stanley Robinson recorded three swats to Thabeet's two. On the '04 team, Okafor's four blocks were surpassed by Josh Boone's seven.

Price scored 20 points in defeat, while Thabeet and Adrian each recorded 12 points and 10 rebounds.

Player of the game: Emeka Okafor (12 points, 12 rebounds, 4 blocks, 3 steals)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '04 UConn 64.0% - '09 UConn 36.0%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '04 UConn 73.1 - '09 UConn 69.9

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '04 UConn vs. '09 UConn
2010-11 Connecticut Huskies
1984-85 St. John's Redmen
5
12
'11 UConn
'85 St. John's
71
81
2010-11 Connecticut: In a true measurement of the quality and depth of the conference, UConn entered the 2011 Big East tournament as a No. 9 seed, despite the school's 21-9 record and top-25 national ranking. The Huskies strung together five wins in as many days to claim the Big East tournament championship. Kemba Walker, who averaged 23.5 points per game during the season, scored a tournament-record 130 points during the five-game stretch to will his team to victory. UConn advanced to the NCAA Tournament as the No. 3 seed in the West Regional and defeated college basketball bluebloods Arizona and Kentucky on its way to the title game. The Huskies then held Butler to 18.8 percent shooting, the lowest championship game field goal percentage in history and the worst in an NCAA tourney game since 1946, en route to ousting the Bulldogs 53-41.

1984-85 St. John's: The Redmen's first Final Four team since 1952 featured a star-studded roster headlined by future Hall-of-Famer and Dream Team member Chris Mullin. The senior won the Wooden Award and his third consecutive Big East Player of the Year award while averaging 19.8 points, 4.8 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 2.1 steals per game. Fellow senior Bill Wennington clogged the lane for St. John's before heading to the NBA and winning three championships with the Chicago Bulls. Forward Walter Berry won the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award the following season. The team also featured freshman point guard Mark Jackson, who enjoyed a 17-year NBA career and ranks third all-time in assists in NBA history. St. John's fell to Georgetown in the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament, their third loss of the year to the Hoyas, and finished the year with a 31-4 record.

-Jake Westrich

Game recap

St. John's coach Lou Carnesecca can take solace when looking at our tournament seeding. At least the Georgetown squad that plagued his '85 team is on the other side of the bracket. Unfortunately, a heavy dose of UConn is in his team's more-immediate future, beginning with the 2011 National Champs.

The game was a matchup of the Huskies' backcourt versus St. John's frontcourt. For most of the contest, the latter had the edge. However, UConn kept it close and took a 64-63 lead off a shot from Jeremy Lamb with less than five minutes remaining. St. John's responded with a 12-2 run to recapture the lead and put the game out of reach. The Redmen prevailed 81-71.

St. John's could do little to slow down Walker, who scored 37 points. Walker received little help from his teammates though, as only Lamb joined him in double figure scoring. UConn could do little to contend with the size of the Redmen front line. Berry and Wennington combined for 25 of St. John's 39 rebounds, while the Huskies only pulled down 24 boards as a team. Berry added 23 points, while Mullin chipped in 20.

St. John's advances to the Elite 8 to take on another UConn foe, the 2003-04 Huskies.

Player of the game: Walter Berry (23 points, 15 rebounds)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '85 St. John's 82.6% - '11 UConn 17.4%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '85 St. John's 79.6 - '11 UConn 69.8

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '85 St. John's vs. '11 UConn
2002-03 Syracuse Orangemen
2009-10 West Virginia Mountaineers
3
14
'03 Syracuse
'10 W. Virginia
73
82
2002-03 Syracuse: Before they changed their nickname to the "Orange," Syracuse was the "Orangemen", led by super-frosh Carmelo Anthony in 2002-03. Sounds of Hakim Warrick blocking a potentially game-tying Kansas three-pointer still echo off the walls of the Super Dome where Syracuse captured the NCAA National Basketball Championship in 2003. Youth is often described as a weakness for any program, but the Orangemen made it their strength. Among the nine players on the final roster, only one was a senior (Kueth Duany). Jeremy McNeil made up the junior class, but the rest were underclassmen. Aside from Anthony and Warrick, freshman Gerry McNamara did his part launching three-ball after three-ball, hitting six in the first half of the title game as his squad won the only NCAA Championship in school history.

2009-10 West Virginia: Prior to the NCAA tournament, the Mountaineers staked claim to their first Big East Tournament Championship. Da'Sean Butler hit his second game-winning shot of the conference tourney, this one over Georgetown, to capture the Big East title. "Huggy Bear" made his deepest run in the tourney since his Nick Van Exel-led Bearcat days back in 1992. Before being routed 78-57 by eventual champion Duke in the Final Four, West Virginia averaged over 71 points while defeating Morgan State, Missouri, Washington and No. 1 seed Kentucky. Bob Huggins led West Virginia to 31 victories, the most in school history. What's even more impressive was that he was able to make that run with no first-round NBA Draft picks. Butler and Devin Ebanks were selected back-to-back in the second round.

-Adam Meyer

Game recap

In the biggest upset of our Best of the Big East tournament, No. 14 seed West Virginia knocks off No. 3 seed Syracuse.

Entering the second half, the Orangemen held a massive 42-27 lead over the Mountaineers. Wellington Smith, Kevin Jones, and Da'Sean Butler would hit five buckets from long range to overcome the deficit. With 1:21 left in the second half, Kueth Duany found Gerry McNamara wide open after a no-look pass on one of his game-high eight assists, giving Syracuse the lead. However, with just under a minute left in regulation, Jones connected on a jump shot to send the game to overtime.

The back-and-forth drama continued in the bonus time. Down by four with just over two minutes to play, Darryl Bryant was fouled twice and nailed all four free throws, tying the game at 79.

Then, with only seconds on the clock, Joe Mazzulla stole the ball from McNamara and promptly called timeout. With West Virginia inbounding the ball from half court, Butler broke away from his defender, caught the pass on the right wing and quickly threw up a prayer. It was answered.

Player of the game: Da'Sean Butler (19 points, 10 rebounds, game-winning shot)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '10 West Virginia 51.8% - '03 Syracuse 48.2%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '10 West Virginia 73.6 - '03 Syracuse 72.2

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '03 Syracuse vs. '10 West Virginia
1984-85 Villanova Wildcats
1995-96 Syracuse Orange
6
11
'85 Villanova
'96 Syracuse
73
76
1984-85 Villanova: In the regular season, the Wildcats were 25-10, and a modest 9-7 in the Big East. However, on April 1, 1985, it was the Georgetown Hoyas that played the role of the fool as Villanova became the lowest-seeded team (No. 8) to win the NCAA Tournament. When Rollie Massimino's team entered the Big Dance, they nearly fell in the first round. Nova was forced to travel to Dayton, Ohio to play the Flyers on their home court. Villanova trailed 23-21 at the half and needed a herculean effort from Ed Pinckney, scoring a game-high 20 points, to thwart Dayton's perfect 17-17 free throw shooting and won by two. Following the opening round scare, our No. 8 seed would go on to defeat Michigan, Maryland, North Carolina, and Memphis before the championship showdown. Rupp Arena held the David vs. Goliath matchup. Future first-overall draftee Patrick Ewing and company shot 6-8 from the charity stripe, while the Wildcats went 22-27. Eventually, the underdog would be victorious in one of the biggest upsets in NCAA Championship history.

1995-96 Syracuse: Our lowest-seeded Syracuse squad made it all the way to the final game in 1996, losing to Jim Boeheim's former assistant, Rick Pitino, and the Kentucky Wildcats. Senior John Wallace led the team, averaging 22.2 points per game and 8.7 rebounds. Throughout the tournament, the Orangemen triumphed over NBA-ready talent Shandon Anderson and his Georgia Bulldogs in the Sweet 16, Paul Pierce's Kansas Jayhawks in the Elite Eight and Erick Dampier's Mississippi State Bulldogs in the Final Four. It took Pitino and his future first-round draft class of Tony Delk, Antoine Walker, Ron Mercer and Derek Anderson to bring Syracuse's run to an end.

-Adam Meyer

Game recap

For Villanova, facing Georgetown's Patrick Ewing-led team seemed like a cake walk compared to this Syracuse team from the mid-90s.

'Cuse and Nova went shot for shot throughout the contest with no team gaining a lead larger than four in the first half.

The second half started out with a "BOOM!" as Otis Hill slammed one home. Hill led the team with 16 points. With four minutes to play, Ed Pinckney would call glass and add to his double-double, handing Villanova a three point lead. From there, Syracuse would go on an 8-0 run with buckets from Hill and Jason Cipolla. Marius Janulis also added his third trifecta of the game.

Hill's dagger with nine ticks remaining erased all doubt that Syracuse would advance in our Round of 16.

Harold Jensen led them all with 20 points and teammate Dwayne McClain tallied 19 points, but they both weren't enough.

The bench was the difference maker. J.B. Reafsnyder and Janulis totaled 19 points, while the Wildcats only managed two points from their subs.

Player of the game: Lazarus Sims (13 points, 8 assists, 4 rebounds)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '96 Syracuse 55.0% - '85 Villanova 45.0%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '96 Syracuse 76.0 - '85 Villanova 74.9

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '85 Villanova vs. '96 Syracuse
1984-85 Georgetown Hoyas
1981-82 Georgetown Hoyas
7
10
'85 Georgetown
'82 Georgetown
80
71
1984-85 Georgetown: Yes, this Hoya's team had a devastating loss in the championship game to Villanova, as previously mentioned, but that doesn't erase their achievements. All-everything center Patrick Ewing captained Georgetown with 313 boards (9.5 per game) and 477 points (14.5 per game). You could count their losses and point deficits on one hand. In late January, Georgetown lost back-to-back games against St. John's (66-65) and Syracuse (65-63). After that slip-up, John Thompson's bunch wouldn't lose again until that final game against Villanova (66-64). Georgetown would avenge their regular season loss to St. John's when they met in the Final Four, upending the Redmen, 77-59. Other tournament wins include: Georgia Tech (60-54), Loyola (65-53), Temple (63-46) and Lehigh (68-43).

1981-82 Georgetown: In Patrick Ewing's freshman campaign, he tallied 469 points (12.7 per game) and 279 rebounds (7.5 per game). Only New Jersey Nets first-round draft choice Eric Floyd scored more points (619) than his teammate. As for their season, the Hoyas lost their first game (against Louisiana-Lafayette) and their last (North Carolina), but few others. Heading into the NCAA Tournament, Georgetown lost only six games and sported a 10-4 Big East record. Though John Thompson was blessed to have the freshman, Ewing, his team was no match for Dean Smith's Tar Heels, who were led by James Worthy, Sam Perkins, Matt Doherty and some guy named Michael Jordan. That MJ dude hit the game-winning shot with 17 seconds left to lift the Heels, 63-62.

-Adam Meyer

Game recap

Georgetown was a lock in this matchup. Also, Patrick Ewing and Bill Martin were guaranteed to advance. While both had nine rebounds, the senior Ewing took freshman Ewing to task in the paint. Senior Ewing racked up a game-high 23 points and four blocks.

In the second half, with just over three minutes remaining, the 1981-82 Hoyas took the lead when Fred Brown dropped his 10th dime of the game, finding Eric Floyd who connected on a contested jump shot.

Horace Broadnax banked it high off the glass for the 1984-85 Hoyas to take the lead and they never looked back. The team, led by the elder Ewing, finished the game on a 12-2 run, pulling away from the early 80's Georgetown team.

Eric Smith led his team with 20 points, but went cold toward the end, missing his last four attempts.

John Thompson's more experienced group won over 92 percent of the time in this simulation.

Player of the game: Patrick Ewing (23 points, 9 rebounds, 5 steals, 4 blocks)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '85 Georgetown 92.4% - '82 Georgetown 7.6%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '85 Georgetown 81.5 - '82 Georgetown 67.6

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '85 Georgetown vs. '82 Georgetown
1983-84 Georgetown Hoyas
2006-07 Georgetown Hoyas
2
15
'84 Georgetown
'07 Georgetown
78
65
1983-84 Georgetown: DePaul, Villanova and St. John's all won by slim margins over the Hoyas in the regular season, but none could best them come tourney time. Finally, Patrick Ewing and the Georgetown Hoyas won the title! Granted, they nearly lost to SMU (37-36) in the first game of the 1984 NCAA Basketball tournament, but that hiccup aside, this was Georgetown's championship to lose. The Hoyas feasted on SMU, Nevada-Las Vegas, Dayton, Kentucky and Houston. Call Ewing a choke artist all you want, but he was able to fend off Hakeem "The Dream" Olajuwon in the 1984 NCAA Championship. Ewing was named Most Outstanding Player of the tourney.

2006-07 Georgetown: Led by junior forward Jeff Green, the 2006-07 Hoyas captured the school's first regular-season and tournament championships since 1989. Green averaged 14.3 points and 6.3 rebounds per game during a Big East Player of the Year campaign. Center Roy Hibbert manned the middle, while Jonathan Wallace handled point guard duties and shot 49 percent from the perimeter. Georgetown earned the No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament and ousted No. 1 seed North Carolina in overtime en route to the Final Four. There, the team fell to a Greg Oden-led Ohio State squad. Following the season, Green parlayed his success into the NBA Draft, where he was selected with the No. 5 pick by the Boston Celtics and traded to the Seattle SuperSonics.

-Adam Meyer

Game recap

Two more Georgetown teams enter the Best of the Big East tournament, but only one survives. Father met son as Patrick Ewing came face-to-face with his son, Patrick Jr., and John Thompson III coached against John Thompson "The Towel."

The "aughts" Hoyas lost the game when they lost the lead at the 15-minute mark of the second half. Bill Martin stepped up and stepped back with a jumper, handing his team the lead, 53-52. From there, the 1983-84 Hoyas never looked back.

Patrick Ewing Sr., in his junior season, led all players in points (19) and rebounds (9). His son (very weird and cool at the same time) could only muster four points and gather two rebounds off the bench.

Unfortunately for "The Third," his team was out-rebounded 32-24.

Player of the game: Patrick Ewing (19 points, 9 rebounds, 5 blocks)

Winning Percentage of 1,001 Simulations: '84 Georgetown 86.8% - '07 Georgetown 13.2%

Average Score of 1,001 Simulations: '84 Georgetown 76.7 - '07 Georgetown 65.6

View Sample Boxscore | Simulate '84 Georgetown vs. '07 Georgetown
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