9/6/2012 4:46 PM
Bryce Harper was a C turned RF.
9/6/2012 5:56 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 9/6/2012 4:46:00 PM (view original):
Bryce Harper was a C turned RF.
and now he's a CF
9/6/2012 7:19 PM
Yeah but we shouldn't count Cs who get moved because they're awesome.  Wil Myers is one of those too.

Doumit got moved because he can hit but he can't play defense and he gets hurt too much at C.


9/8/2012 2:54 PM
I'm thinking this guy  Hardball Dynasty – Fantasy Baseball Sim Games - Player Profile: Bengie Chantres is a perfect candidate for a team I just took over. 
Had almost resigned myself to trading him to an AL team but don't really wanna lose that bat. 
9/8/2012 3:29 PM
Craig Biggio went from C to 2B to CF.  Try that in this game!!!
9/8/2012 3:40 PM
Hey Mike, I gave this a shot with a DH I had on my bench:

Vladamir Guiterez

5 errors and 12 negative plays in 568 innings.

Is this good or bad? any suggestions?

9/8/2012 8:17 PM
As far as positve defense(less negative defense), he's doing as well as your other RF.

 

 

inn

po

A

e

Plus

neg

Total

PPPS

Brett Leverton

RF

499

73

2

2

0

2

0.142

207.5

Amp Lansing

RF

66.2

12

0

0

0

0

0.181

264.3

Santiago Liriano

RF

25.2

8

1

0

0

1

0.317

462.9

 

 

590.4

93

3

2

0

3

0.154

224.7

Vladimir Gutierrez

RF

575

103

3

5

0

12

0.155

225.7



If his bat is carrying his comparable D, he's fine.
9/9/2012 4:10 PM
Opponent's speed and baserunning aggressiveness is a variable you don't appear to be factoring into your analysis.  Seems to me aggressive first to third/second to home on a single teams  are going to net a lot more runs against your low range RFs.  That's the way I would try to counter your rock-in-
RF strategy anyway.  Although I'm not sure if there would be an effective way of measuring whether my counter strategy worked or not.
9/9/2012 5:22 PM

The arm is the same as a "normal" RF.    Range won't be a factor in baserunning aggressiveness.

9/9/2012 6:16 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 9/9/2012 5:22:00 PM (view original):

The arm is the same as a "normal" RF.    Range won't be a factor in baserunning aggressiveness.

I'm not so sure that's correct.  A catcher playing RF,  with low range,  and generally low speed since he's a catcher,  will get to fewer balls and get to balls later.  The speedy batter and baserunner,  with  very aggressive baserunning settings, "read" the C/RF's low ratings, and their own high ratings and settings, (through the magic of HBD's AI) and exploit your C/RF ruthlessly.  The AI may or may not operate like this.  I like to think it does.  Why else would WIS give us speed,  range, base running,  very aggessive, and so on, ratings and settings?  In any event,  your analysis of the issue does not control for opponents'  baserunning settings and baserunning/speed ratings.  Therefore your analysis may be skewed a bit in favor of your Rock-in-RF.  Certainly,  without controlling for the variables of opponent's ratings and settings,  your analysis, is,  at best,  incomplete.  Thoughtful and reasonable (as always) but incomplete.   
9/9/2012 6:29 PM
While I might like to think the engine works the way you lay out, I don't think it does.   An OF gets to a ball or he doesn't.    If he doesn't, he gets a negative play.   If he does, glove and arm are now in play.   He could make an error or field it cleanly.   If he fields it cleanly, it's all arm.   And, as I said earlier, arm seems to be key to RF whereas range and glove are the important factors in LF/CF.
9/9/2012 8:30 PM
I think the key words in your last post are the ones you use in regard to what happens after the RF gets the ball:  "It's all arm."  That's where I think you trip up.  It's not all arm.  It's the RF's arm ratings weighed in relation to the baserunners' speed/baserunning ratings and aggressiveness settings.  There can be little in HBD that is "all" one rating or another,  The dozens and hundreds of permutations and combinations of ratings and settings take on an array of weights and proportions in  relation to one another depending on each precipitating event in the game.  If,  at a certain point in the AI's decision tree,  a single rating would become 100% outcome determinative that would fly in the face of what I've been taught about computer programing.  My programing and coding knowledge is admitedly dated,  and also quite rusty,  but I doubt modern programing has gotten as simplistic as you make it out to be in this instance.  If it were this game would not be called Hardball Dynasty.  It would be called Go Fish.  
9/9/2012 8:35 PM

OK, I'll play.   Who has the better chance of throwing out a base runner?
Player A:   65 range, 50 glove, 70 arm strength, 65 arm accuracy
Player B:   9 range, 27 glove, 74 arm strength, 72 arm accuracy

Same ratings, which player is more likely to be run on?

The baserunner settings, speed and skill aren't changing the fielder's ratings.   

9/9/2012 9:20 PM
To put it another way, I'm sure you know footwork, positioning and angles are all paramount to making a good throw.   I don't think the game incorporates that.
9/9/2012 9:32 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 9/9/2012 8:35:00 PM (view original):

OK, I'll play.   Who has the better chance of throwing out a base runner?
Player A:   65 range, 50 glove, 70 arm strength, 65 arm accuracy
Player B:   9 range, 27 glove, 74 arm strength, 72 arm accuracy

Same ratings, which player is more likely to be run on?

The baserunner settings, speed and skill aren't changing the fielder's ratings.   

That's a nice puzzler.  And nicely resonsive to my criticism of your C/RF experimental methodology.  My answer is:  I don't know.  It would depend on which variables are in play on any given play.    I'll take a guess though,  based on an assumption that all other variables (ratings) are held equal for control purposes.

Let us assume a runner on first.  The runner is fast, has a high baserunning rating, and is on a team with an aggressive baserunning setting.  My guess is said baserunner,  on a hit to RF,  is going to attempt first to third 100% of the time against RF B because RF B is unlikely to  get to the ball in time.  Said baserunner will attempt first to third 75% of the time against RF A because RF A is a near average RF and said baserunner is an above average baserunner with about about a 25% edge.   
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