All Forums > SimLeague Baseball > SimLeague Baseball > Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte - Presente !
9/29/2013 4:12 AM


 

HOUSTON -- Mariano Rivera has thrown his final pitch. The all-time saves leader said on Saturday that he has decided to allow the last moment of his playing career to be an emotional embrace on the Yankee Stadium mound.

"I'm done, guys. I'm done," Rivera said. "I gave everything that I have."

Rivera said that he was blessed with the ideal conclusion to his career on Thursday, when the 43-year-old closer retired all four Rays batters he faced and tearfully handed the ball off to longtime teammates Andy Pettitte and Derek Jeter.

"I know it was the perfect moment," Rivera said. "It was something I would have never expected."

 

 

Rivera also revealed that he has been pitching with "tremendous soreness" in his right forearm for some time, but that he did not want to talk about it, instead silently managing it to get through the season.

He said that he had to give everything he had to face those final four Tampa Bay hitters.

"I think I squeezed every ounce of fuel out of my tank," Rivera said. "It is empty. I have nothing left."

Yankees manager Joe Girardi had given Rivera full control to decide if and when he would play during the final three games of the regular season against the Astros.

Girardi said that he checked with Rivera about pitching on Friday and was told that Rivera was unavailable. Rivera again told Girardi on Saturday that he was not able to pitch.

Girardi believes that Thursday's Yankee Stadium sendoff was so well choreographed that Rivera is reluctant to make another appearance.

"I think that's a big part of it," Girardi said. "That was a special night for him, and the way it unfolded, I think he wants it to end that way. But if he changes his mind, it's OK. Whatever he wants to do."

Rivera has also shied away from his desire to play center field for an inning. Girardi has said that he "absolutely" would permit Rivera to do so, but Rivera has voiced concerns about the state of his surgically reconstructed right knee.

"I did consider it strongly," Rivera said. "If it would have been a few years earlier, I would have done it. Now my knee is not cooperating. I'm not going to make a fool of myself out there. I respect the game too much for me to do something that I'm not supposed to be doing."

"At least I gave him the opportunity," Girardi said. "It's his decision."

Rivera is set to retire with 652 career regular-season saves, plus an all-time record 42 more in the postseason. Rivera owns a 2.21 ERA in 1,115 regular-season games and an 0.70 ERA in 96 postseason contests.

The Astros will honor Rivera in a pregame ceremony Sunday. Rivera said that he is planning to spend a considerable amount of time signing autographs and meeting with fans during his last three days as a Major Leaguer.

"My message is, thank you. Thank you for your support," Rivera said. "It has been amazing. The fans have been spectacular. You see how much time I've spent signing, because I think they deserve it. That's the least that I can do for them. Definitely, I thank them very much."

 

Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and read his MLBlog, Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

     

    NYY@HOU: Pettitte goes distance in final career start

     

    HOUSTON -- Andy Pettitte held the glove high in front of his face, his eyes intently peering over the black leather for the final time. In this season of farewells, the Yankees left-hander closed out his career with one more vintage performance.

    Pettitte fought back emotions, ignored his aching body and emptied the tank to pitch his first complete game in seven years, spinning a five-hitter in a 2-1 victory over the Astros on Saturday night at Minute Maid Park.

    "I couldn't have dreamed of this working out the way it did," Pettitte said. "I'm just so thankful and feel so blessed and fortunate. I just feel like God worked this out exactly perfect; another day I'll never forget."

    In the dugout before the ninth inning, Pettitte asked pitching coach Larry Rothschild if he had enough left to finish the game. Rothschild shrugged, so Pettitte told manager Joe Girardi that if anyone got on base, he should "bring the kid in," referring to acting closer David Robertson.

    Pettitte quickly recorded two outs on fly balls to right field, but Chris Carter flared a pitch into left field for a single. Girardi walked slowly to the mound, but quickly reversed course after tapping Pettitte on the chest.

    "We left the decision in his hands every inning that he went back out," Girardi said. "He said, 'I can finish it.' I said, 'Go ahead then.'"

    Pettitte did, inducing J.D. Martinez to chop a ground ball to third base that marked Pettitte's 26th career complete game and his first since Aug. 16, 2006, when he was pitching for the Astros against the Cubs.

    A series of hugs and handshakes followed, and Pettitte doffed his cap to the crowd of 37,199, a mixture of Yankees and Astros fans who spent the ninth inning standing and chanting his name.

    Pettitte shed tears when the baby-faced Astros spilled onto the field to offer their applause.

    "That was just a moment that I feel like I didn't deserve," said Pettitte, again choking back his emotions. "And I appreciated it."

    Houston's only run came on a fourth-inning groundout as Pettitte completed an 18-year career that wrapped up with his 256th career victory, ranking 42nd all time.

    "I'm trying to figure out why the guy is retiring, as well as he threw the ball tonight," Astros manager Bo Porter said.

    The lone member of the "Core Four" who did not spend his entire career in pinstripes, Pettitte said that it was fitting that he was able to end his career in Houston, where he went 37-26 from 2004-06 and helped the Astros to the 2005 World Series.

    "I was driving in today thinking about Joe catching me, and now he's managing me," Pettitte said. "It's a good day, but man, it was a sad day, too."

    Girardi said that the intensity in the dugout "felt like a playoff game," appropriate considering Pettitte exits as the all-time postseason wins leader with 19.

    "I think that everyone in that dugout wanted it so bad for him, to go out on a winning note," Girardi said.

    He had never compiled a losing record in his career, and Saturday's victory allowed Pettitte to finish his final season 11-11 with a 3.74 ERA in 30 starts. He was at his best in the season's final two months, reeling off nine straight quality starts as the Yankees fought to qualify for the playoffs.

    "I just know that I didn't want to have a losing record," Pettitte said.

    After being blanked through five frames by the Astros' Paul Clemens, the Yankees gave Pettitte the only runs he needed in the sixth inning. Robinson Cano stroked a run-scoring single to right field that drove home Chris Stewart with the first Yankees run.

    With Chia-Jen Lo on in relief, Eduardo Nunez was able to score as catcher Matt Pagnozzi committed a strange error, spiking the ball into the dirt around home plate as he attempted to throw to second base with Cano on the move.

    "Truly, it's going to be an honor to be able to look back and tell my kids I got to toe the same mound as Andy on his last day," Clemens said.

    A notoriously tough critic of himself in postgame interviews, Pettitte said that he was glad that he did not have to go into retirement lamenting a misplaced pitch that might have spoiled the night.

    "That's a good feeling," Pettitte said. "The last thing I wanted to do was be in here saying, 'Man, I hung a slider!'"

    Pettitte completes his career with 219 victories over his 15 seasons as a Yankee, ranking third on the franchise's all-time list behind Whitey Ford (236) and Red Ruffing (231).

    "It's a shame we've got to get old and you can't just continue to play this game," Pettitte said. "But just how blessed and fortunate I am, to be able to play a game and get paid to do it, it's just been incredible."

     

    Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and read his MLBlog,Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

  •  
10/4/2013 9:01 PM
more men have walked on the moon then have scored runs on Rivera in Post-Season
10/7/2013 7:59 PM
Rivera is certainly a first ballot HOFer.  But how about Pettitte?  Not many starting pitchers as good as him during the years he played.  If he gets in, it probably will take 20 years. 
10/7/2013 10:19 PM
Posted by italyprof on 9/29/2013 4:12:00 AM (view original):


 

HOUSTON -- Mariano Rivera has thrown his final pitch. The all-time saves leader said on Saturday that he has decided to allow the last moment of his playing career to be an emotional embrace on the Yankee Stadium mound.

"I'm done, guys. I'm done," Rivera said. "I gave everything that I have."

Rivera said that he was blessed with the ideal conclusion to his career on Thursday, when the 43-year-old closer retired all four Rays batters he faced and tearfully handed the ball off to longtime teammates Andy Pettitte and Derek Jeter.

"I know it was the perfect moment," Rivera said. "It was something I would have never expected."

 

 

Rivera also revealed that he has been pitching with "tremendous soreness" in his right forearm for some time, but that he did not want to talk about it, instead silently managing it to get through the season.

He said that he had to give everything he had to face those final four Tampa Bay hitters.

"I think I squeezed every ounce of fuel out of my tank," Rivera said. "It is empty. I have nothing left."

Yankees manager Joe Girardi had given Rivera full control to decide if and when he would play during the final three games of the regular season against the Astros.

Girardi said that he checked with Rivera about pitching on Friday and was told that Rivera was unavailable. Rivera again told Girardi on Saturday that he was not able to pitch.

Girardi believes that Thursday's Yankee Stadium sendoff was so well choreographed that Rivera is reluctant to make another appearance.

"I think that's a big part of it," Girardi said. "That was a special night for him, and the way it unfolded, I think he wants it to end that way. But if he changes his mind, it's OK. Whatever he wants to do."

Rivera has also shied away from his desire to play center field for an inning. Girardi has said that he "absolutely" would permit Rivera to do so, but Rivera has voiced concerns about the state of his surgically reconstructed right knee.

"I did consider it strongly," Rivera said. "If it would have been a few years earlier, I would have done it. Now my knee is not cooperating. I'm not going to make a fool of myself out there. I respect the game too much for me to do something that I'm not supposed to be doing."

"At least I gave him the opportunity," Girardi said. "It's his decision."

Rivera is set to retire with 652 career regular-season saves, plus an all-time record 42 more in the postseason. Rivera owns a 2.21 ERA in 1,115 regular-season games and an 0.70 ERA in 96 postseason contests.

The Astros will honor Rivera in a pregame ceremony Sunday. Rivera said that he is planning to spend a considerable amount of time signing autographs and meeting with fans during his last three days as a Major Leaguer.

"My message is, thank you. Thank you for your support," Rivera said. "It has been amazing. The fans have been spectacular. You see how much time I've spent signing, because I think they deserve it. That's the least that I can do for them. Definitely, I thank them very much."

 

Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and read his MLBlog, Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

     

    NYY@HOU: Pettitte goes distance in final career start

     

    HOUSTON -- Andy Pettitte held the glove high in front of his face, his eyes intently peering over the black leather for the final time. In this season of farewells, the Yankees left-hander closed out his career with one more vintage performance.

    Pettitte fought back emotions, ignored his aching body and emptied the tank to pitch his first complete game in seven years, spinning a five-hitter in a 2-1 victory over the Astros on Saturday night at Minute Maid Park.

    "I couldn't have dreamed of this working out the way it did," Pettitte said. "I'm just so thankful and feel so blessed and fortunate. I just feel like God worked this out exactly perfect; another day I'll never forget."

    In the dugout before the ninth inning, Pettitte asked pitching coach Larry Rothschild if he had enough left to finish the game. Rothschild shrugged, so Pettitte told manager Joe Girardi that if anyone got on base, he should "bring the kid in," referring to acting closer David Robertson.

    Pettitte quickly recorded two outs on fly balls to right field, but Chris Carter flared a pitch into left field for a single. Girardi walked slowly to the mound, but quickly reversed course after tapping Pettitte on the chest.

    "We left the decision in his hands every inning that he went back out," Girardi said. "He said, 'I can finish it.' I said, 'Go ahead then.'"

    Pettitte did, inducing J.D. Martinez to chop a ground ball to third base that marked Pettitte's 26th career complete game and his first since Aug. 16, 2006, when he was pitching for the Astros against the Cubs.

    A series of hugs and handshakes followed, and Pettitte doffed his cap to the crowd of 37,199, a mixture of Yankees and Astros fans who spent the ninth inning standing and chanting his name.

    Pettitte shed tears when the baby-faced Astros spilled onto the field to offer their applause.

    "That was just a moment that I feel like I didn't deserve," said Pettitte, again choking back his emotions. "And I appreciated it."

    Houston's only run came on a fourth-inning groundout as Pettitte completed an 18-year career that wrapped up with his 256th career victory, ranking 42nd all time.

    "I'm trying to figure out why the guy is retiring, as well as he threw the ball tonight," Astros manager Bo Porter said.

    The lone member of the "Core Four" who did not spend his entire career in pinstripes, Pettitte said that it was fitting that he was able to end his career in Houston, where he went 37-26 from 2004-06 and helped the Astros to the 2005 World Series.

    "I was driving in today thinking about Joe catching me, and now he's managing me," Pettitte said. "It's a good day, but man, it was a sad day, too."

    Girardi said that the intensity in the dugout "felt like a playoff game," appropriate considering Pettitte exits as the all-time postseason wins leader with 19.

    "I think that everyone in that dugout wanted it so bad for him, to go out on a winning note," Girardi said.

    He had never compiled a losing record in his career, and Saturday's victory allowed Pettitte to finish his final season 11-11 with a 3.74 ERA in 30 starts. He was at his best in the season's final two months, reeling off nine straight quality starts as the Yankees fought to qualify for the playoffs.

    "I just know that I didn't want to have a losing record," Pettitte said.

    After being blanked through five frames by the Astros' Paul Clemens, the Yankees gave Pettitte the only runs he needed in the sixth inning. Robinson Cano stroked a run-scoring single to right field that drove home Chris Stewart with the first Yankees run.

    With Chia-Jen Lo on in relief, Eduardo Nunez was able to score as catcher Matt Pagnozzi committed a strange error, spiking the ball into the dirt around home plate as he attempted to throw to second base with Cano on the move.

    "Truly, it's going to be an honor to be able to look back and tell my kids I got to toe the same mound as Andy on his last day," Clemens said.

    A notoriously tough critic of himself in postgame interviews, Pettitte said that he was glad that he did not have to go into retirement lamenting a misplaced pitch that might have spoiled the night.

    "That's a good feeling," Pettitte said. "The last thing I wanted to do was be in here saying, 'Man, I hung a slider!'"

    Pettitte completes his career with 219 victories over his 15 seasons as a Yankee, ranking third on the franchise's all-time list behind Whitey Ford (236) and Red Ruffing (231).

    "It's a shame we've got to get old and you can't just continue to play this game," Pettitte said. "But just how blessed and fortunate I am, to be able to play a game and get paid to do it, it's just been incredible."

     

    Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and read his MLBlog,Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

  •  
You do realize you can link, right?  ;-)
10/14/2013 12:58 PM
I just thank God that all this hullaballu regarding Rivera's farewell tour is over.   It was, IMHO, way over the top
10/14/2013 1:13 PM
Then just wait for the Jeter farewell tour...
10/15/2013 12:45 PM
Posted by skunk206 on 10/14/2013 1:13:00 PM (view original):
Then just wait for the Jeter farewell tour...
We can only hope that he will, like Shane in the classic western movie of the same name, just walk off into the sunset.  I don't see him being an integral part of the team going forward.    I know that's false hope.
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