6/25/2014 12:33 PM
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 12:16:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 11:45:00 AM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 11:31:00 AM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 10:39:00 AM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 10:34:00 AM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 9:24:00 AM (view original):
What about b2b sales? If I sell a component piece to a company that makes a product, do they pay a tax on that component?
No. Only the end user pays taxes when the good or service is bought.

The thought is it will reduce the cost of producing goods because they don't get taxed 15 times along the way.... And through competition drive the end price down which offsets the 23% sales tax for the consumer.


The FAQ has all of this in it. Its a really good tax system.... Its fair and best of all its simple.
So if I run a small construction company and buy a truck, no sales tax?
From the FAQ.... The answer is no sales tax for the business. See below.



Does the FairTax tax used items?

The FairTax does not tax "used" goods but it is important to note that HR25 has a legal definition of the term "used". This is necessary to ensure that items are taxed only once and to prevent tax cheating.

Under the FairTax, for an item to be considered "used" it must be:

(1) purchased before the FairTax is enacted, or

(2) the FairTax on the item must have been previously paid.

Let's look at (1) above. Assume that Joe bought a new car in January of 2012. Let's further assume that the FairTax went into effect on Jan. 1, 2013. Since Joe owned the car before the enactment of the FairTax, it is considered a "used" car. It has the taxes from the existing tax system embedded in its price. Therefore, when Joe sells that car to Bill, Bill will not owe tax on the transaction.

Now, let's consider (2) above. The most common example is that Joe buys a new car for personal use and pays the FairTax on it. If Joe then sells his car to Bill, there would be no tax on it because the tax had already been paid. Let's look at another example. Assume that Joe owns a flower shop business and buys a van to use when making deliveries to his customers. No tax is charged on purchases for business purposes so that the FairTax on goods sold to consumers does not double tax, or put a tax on a tax.

If Joe decides to sell the van to his friend Bill (who is not in business) for use as his personal vehicle, then it would be a taxable sale to Bill. Why? Because Joe did not pay tax when he bought the van for his flower shop. Since no FairTax has been previously paid on that van, it is not considered used and the sale to Bill would be taxable.

If later, Bill decided he did not like driving a van and sold it to someone else, it would not be a taxable sale. Why? Because the tax had been previously paid (when Bill bought it from Joe) making the item "used"; and not subject to tax.
Sounds like a cluster ****.

Since you're such a fan of "read the website," check this out:

www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2008/jan/23/adding-fairtax/
Point 1.... I'm not fixated on screwing the rich like some people are. The fair tax taxes everyone equally if they choose to buy something. The wealthy still spend more $$$ than the poor thus they will still pay a higher % of the tax burden. In some cases like cigarettes the current 50% sales taxes will drop to 23% which will help the 28% of those in poverty that smoke to have more spendable money. The prebate is a nice addition and its simple.

Point 2.... Their will always be black markets. Right now I can gamble online even though its illegal. I can buy drugs and guns pretty easily. I also can buy things online and skip sales tax. The good news is those IRS agents out of jobs under a fair tax can find a job trying to close these markets. This is probably the biggest drawback to the Fair Tax. The good outweighs the bad IMO.... And if people are doing things illegally I hope they are prosecuted for it.

Point 3... Of course it's a political nightmare... At first. Its a big change and most people fear change. Retirees will get over it. For one it repairs the social security system which is bankrupt.... For 2 they will no longer be taxed on SSI, Pension, IRA incomes. They will have more money... And possibly a prebate too. I'm sure lobbyists will be ****** too... They can't lobby for tax loopholes anymore.

The FAQ addresses a lot of these issues.... Like social security and mortgage interest deductions.
1) 23% is a big tax increase for almost everyone. Most people with middle class incomes only pay between 10% and 15% in Federal Taxes. The poor pay between 0% and 10%, usually. You not fixated on screwing the rich. You're fixated on screwing the poor and middle classes.

2) Arguing that people will find a way around a law is a terrible argument against a law. On the other hand, the way around this law is simple and legal. Buy used whenever possible. I think this would drive revenue down and force the tax rate to go up even more.

3) It's an everything nightmare.

 - It's not simpler, it's convoluted and difficult to enforce.
 - It raises taxes for the vast majority of the population.
 - It lowers taxes for people who can actually afford to pay high taxes. 

The fair tax is a scam, thought up by rich people who don't like paying a lot of taxes. It's packaged with the word "fair" and sold to idiots who are convinced that they too will one day be millionaires.
6/25/2014 12:35 PM
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 12:23:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:19:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:14:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 11:04:00 AM (view original):
A truck is not a component piece, and your company is the end user with respect to the truck.  I would think that you would pay sales tax.
My bad.  According to the FAQ, any business purchases specifically for business use (such as a truck) would not be subject to sales tax.
But then if I sell the truck, I have to determine how the buyer will use it in order to know if I need to collect the tax on the sale.

Fun.

Well its 1 of 2 choices... Either its used for business or its used for personal. One is taxed the other isn't.

Sounds like a mole hill... Not a mountain.
So when the buyer says he will use it for business, do I have to make him prove it? What if I believe him and don't collect the tax? Who's *** is on the line?
6/25/2014 12:37 PM
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:19:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:14:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 11:04:00 AM (view original):
A truck is not a component piece, and your company is the end user with respect to the truck.  I would think that you would pay sales tax.
My bad.  According to the FAQ, any business purchases specifically for business use (such as a truck) would not be subject to sales tax.
But then if I sell the truck, I have to determine how the buyer will use it in order to know if I need to collect the tax on the sale.

Fun.

Unless you're a wholesaler (which you would NOT be if you were a small business selling a no longer needed asset, such as a truck), I think you would still be collecting the sales tax.  The burden would be on the buyer, if they were a business, to get a rebate of the sales tax if they were using the truck for business purposes.

So no problem here for you.

6/25/2014 12:41 PM
Posted by toddcommish on 6/25/2014 11:26:00 AM (view original):
And lowering (or eliminating) corporate taxes will keep some of those businesses in the US rather than fleeing to other countries with more corporation-friendly tax laws, which means MORE jobs which means MORE tax revenue.

Liberals always seem to miss that point when crying for higher corporate taxes.
Companies take jobs overseas to avoid US labor costs, mostly. There is no tax rate low enough to make US employees attractive when Chinese workers can do the job for $1.50 an hour.
6/25/2014 12:42 PM
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:37:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:19:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:14:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 11:04:00 AM (view original):
A truck is not a component piece, and your company is the end user with respect to the truck.  I would think that you would pay sales tax.
My bad.  According to the FAQ, any business purchases specifically for business use (such as a truck) would not be subject to sales tax.
But then if I sell the truck, I have to determine how the buyer will use it in order to know if I need to collect the tax on the sale.

Fun.

Unless you're a wholesaler (which you would NOT be if you were a small business selling a no longer needed asset, such as a truck), I think you would still be collecting the sales tax.  The burden would be on the buyer, if they were a business, to get a rebate of the sales tax if they were using the truck for business purposes.

So no problem here for you.

This all seems much more complicated than just filling a tax return.
6/25/2014 12:47 PM
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:42:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:37:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:19:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:14:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 11:04:00 AM (view original):
A truck is not a component piece, and your company is the end user with respect to the truck.  I would think that you would pay sales tax.
My bad.  According to the FAQ, any business purchases specifically for business use (such as a truck) would not be subject to sales tax.
But then if I sell the truck, I have to determine how the buyer will use it in order to know if I need to collect the tax on the sale.

Fun.

Unless you're a wholesaler (which you would NOT be if you were a small business selling a no longer needed asset, such as a truck), I think you would still be collecting the sales tax.  The burden would be on the buyer, if they were a business, to get a rebate of the sales tax if they were using the truck for business purposes.

So no problem here for you.

This all seems much more complicated than just filling a tax return.
It does?

Please explain.

6/25/2014 12:50 PM
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:41:00 PM (view original):
Posted by toddcommish on 6/25/2014 11:26:00 AM (view original):
And lowering (or eliminating) corporate taxes will keep some of those businesses in the US rather than fleeing to other countries with more corporation-friendly tax laws, which means MORE jobs which means MORE tax revenue.

Liberals always seem to miss that point when crying for higher corporate taxes.
Companies take jobs overseas to avoid US labor costs, mostly. There is no tax rate low enough to make US employees attractive when Chinese workers can do the job for $1.50 an hour.
Companies take jobs oversees in order to reduce expenses.  Lowering or eliminating corporate taxes would significantly reduce expenses, offsetting the "burden" of US labor costs.

Unless you think all corporations are evil, and will still go offshore anyways, no matter what.

6/25/2014 12:56 PM
So some business expenses are taxed but others aren't and if a business buys something used from someone who hasn't already paid taxes on the item, the business has to pay the tax upfront and then file to get a rebate. But if the person has already paid the tax on the item, then the business buying the used item doesn't have to pay the tax.

Not only is this just as complicated as the current system, it's even easier to get around because all parties will have an incentive to lie.

Right now, a business pays a vendor and then 1099's that vendor/contractor so that the business can write off the expense. And the vendor pays taxes based on the 1099's filed.
6/25/2014 12:58 PM
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:33:00 PM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 12:16:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 11:45:00 AM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 11:31:00 AM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 10:39:00 AM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 10:34:00 AM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 9:24:00 AM (view original):
What about b2b sales? If I sell a component piece to a company that makes a product, do they pay a tax on that component?
No. Only the end user pays taxes when the good or service is bought.

The thought is it will reduce the cost of producing goods because they don't get taxed 15 times along the way.... And through competition drive the end price down which offsets the 23% sales tax for the consumer.


The FAQ has all of this in it. Its a really good tax system.... Its fair and best of all its simple.
So if I run a small construction company and buy a truck, no sales tax?
From the FAQ.... The answer is no sales tax for the business. See below.



Does the FairTax tax used items?

The FairTax does not tax "used" goods but it is important to note that HR25 has a legal definition of the term "used". This is necessary to ensure that items are taxed only once and to prevent tax cheating.

Under the FairTax, for an item to be considered "used" it must be:

(1) purchased before the FairTax is enacted, or

(2) the FairTax on the item must have been previously paid.

Let's look at (1) above. Assume that Joe bought a new car in January of 2012. Let's further assume that the FairTax went into effect on Jan. 1, 2013. Since Joe owned the car before the enactment of the FairTax, it is considered a "used" car. It has the taxes from the existing tax system embedded in its price. Therefore, when Joe sells that car to Bill, Bill will not owe tax on the transaction.

Now, let's consider (2) above. The most common example is that Joe buys a new car for personal use and pays the FairTax on it. If Joe then sells his car to Bill, there would be no tax on it because the tax had already been paid. Let's look at another example. Assume that Joe owns a flower shop business and buys a van to use when making deliveries to his customers. No tax is charged on purchases for business purposes so that the FairTax on goods sold to consumers does not double tax, or put a tax on a tax.

If Joe decides to sell the van to his friend Bill (who is not in business) for use as his personal vehicle, then it would be a taxable sale to Bill. Why? Because Joe did not pay tax when he bought the van for his flower shop. Since no FairTax has been previously paid on that van, it is not considered used and the sale to Bill would be taxable.

If later, Bill decided he did not like driving a van and sold it to someone else, it would not be a taxable sale. Why? Because the tax had been previously paid (when Bill bought it from Joe) making the item "used"; and not subject to tax.
Sounds like a cluster ****.

Since you're such a fan of "read the website," check this out:

www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2008/jan/23/adding-fairtax/
Point 1.... I'm not fixated on screwing the rich like some people are. The fair tax taxes everyone equally if they choose to buy something. The wealthy still spend more $$$ than the poor thus they will still pay a higher % of the tax burden. In some cases like cigarettes the current 50% sales taxes will drop to 23% which will help the 28% of those in poverty that smoke to have more spendable money. The prebate is a nice addition and its simple.

Point 2.... Their will always be black markets. Right now I can gamble online even though its illegal. I can buy drugs and guns pretty easily. I also can buy things online and skip sales tax. The good news is those IRS agents out of jobs under a fair tax can find a job trying to close these markets. This is probably the biggest drawback to the Fair Tax. The good outweighs the bad IMO.... And if people are doing things illegally I hope they are prosecuted for it.

Point 3... Of course it's a political nightmare... At first. Its a big change and most people fear change. Retirees will get over it. For one it repairs the social security system which is bankrupt.... For 2 they will no longer be taxed on SSI, Pension, IRA incomes. They will have more money... And possibly a prebate too. I'm sure lobbyists will be ****** too... They can't lobby for tax loopholes anymore.

The FAQ addresses a lot of these issues.... Like social security and mortgage interest deductions.
1) 23% is a big tax increase for almost everyone. Most people with middle class incomes only pay between 10% and 15% in Federal Taxes. The poor pay between 0% and 10%, usually. You not fixated on screwing the rich. You're fixated on screwing the poor and middle classes.

2) Arguing that people will find a way around a law is a terrible argument against a law. On the other hand, the way around this law is simple and legal. Buy used whenever possible. I think this would drive revenue down and force the tax rate to go up even more.

3) It's an everything nightmare.

 - It's not simpler, it's convoluted and difficult to enforce.
 - It raises taxes for the vast majority of the population.
 - It lowers taxes for people who can actually afford to pay high taxes. 

The fair tax is a scam, thought up by rich people who don't like paying a lot of taxes. It's packaged with the word "fair" and sold to idiots who are convinced that they too will one day be millionaires.
1) no they pay 15% on federal taxes PLUS 7% on sales taxes so a 23% sales tax is a wash.

2) is buying used a bad thing? It saves money, it's better for the environment, right?

3) Lol... How I it NOT simpler than the 2000 tax forms we currently have today. I'm shocked . we only have to ENFORCE it on businesses which we already do since they CURRENTLY pay collected sales taxes... That in and of itself is not a change at all from what is currently enforced.... BUT we would no longer need to enforce the 85 million families that file taxes every year which saves a ton of money, time, and opportunity for tax payers to defraud the system. It IS simpler to enforce AND reduces fraud risk.
6/25/2014 12:59 PM
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:50:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:41:00 PM (view original):
Posted by toddcommish on 6/25/2014 11:26:00 AM (view original):
And lowering (or eliminating) corporate taxes will keep some of those businesses in the US rather than fleeing to other countries with more corporation-friendly tax laws, which means MORE jobs which means MORE tax revenue.

Liberals always seem to miss that point when crying for higher corporate taxes.
Companies take jobs overseas to avoid US labor costs, mostly. There is no tax rate low enough to make US employees attractive when Chinese workers can do the job for $1.50 an hour.
Companies take jobs oversees in order to reduce expenses.  Lowering or eliminating corporate taxes would significantly reduce expenses, offsetting the "burden" of US labor costs.

Unless you think all corporations are evil, and will still go offshore anyways, no matter what.

It's not evil. But any company (at least a public company) is essentially obligated to their shareholders to take jobs overseas if it makes financial sense. Cutting the corporate tax, a tax that most large companies are able to, at least partially, get around, doesn't come close to offsetting the gap between the labor cost of an American worker and the cost of an overseas worker.
6/25/2014 1:00 PM
Which business expense are taxed?
6/25/2014 1:01 PM
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:37:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:19:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:14:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 11:04:00 AM (view original):
A truck is not a component piece, and your company is the end user with respect to the truck.  I would think that you would pay sales tax.
My bad.  According to the FAQ, any business purchases specifically for business use (such as a truck) would not be subject to sales tax.
But then if I sell the truck, I have to determine how the buyer will use it in order to know if I need to collect the tax on the sale.

Fun.

Unless you're a wholesaler (which you would NOT be if you were a small business selling a no longer needed asset, such as a truck), I think you would still be collecting the sales tax.  The burden would be on the buyer, if they were a business, to get a rebate of the sales tax if they were using the truck for business purposes.

So no problem here for you.

Correct. Simple. You're selling a truck. There is a purchasers agreement, right? Check yes for personal use or check yes for business use. Done.
6/25/2014 1:02 PM
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:59:00 PM (view original):
Posted by tecwrg on 6/25/2014 12:50:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:41:00 PM (view original):
Posted by toddcommish on 6/25/2014 11:26:00 AM (view original):
And lowering (or eliminating) corporate taxes will keep some of those businesses in the US rather than fleeing to other countries with more corporation-friendly tax laws, which means MORE jobs which means MORE tax revenue.

Liberals always seem to miss that point when crying for higher corporate taxes.
Companies take jobs overseas to avoid US labor costs, mostly. There is no tax rate low enough to make US employees attractive when Chinese workers can do the job for $1.50 an hour.
Companies take jobs oversees in order to reduce expenses.  Lowering or eliminating corporate taxes would significantly reduce expenses, offsetting the "burden" of US labor costs.

Unless you think all corporations are evil, and will still go offshore anyways, no matter what.

It's not evil. But any company (at least a public company) is essentially obligated to their shareholders to take jobs overseas if it makes financial sense. Cutting the corporate tax, a tax that most large companies are able to, at least partially, get around, doesn't come close to offsetting the gap between the labor cost of an American worker and the cost of an overseas worker.
Sounds like you have no problem with companies sending jobs offshore.

Interesting.

6/25/2014 1:07 PM
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:41:00 PM (view original):
Posted by toddcommish on 6/25/2014 11:26:00 AM (view original):
And lowering (or eliminating) corporate taxes will keep some of those businesses in the US rather than fleeing to other countries with more corporation-friendly tax laws, which means MORE jobs which means MORE tax revenue.

Liberals always seem to miss that point when crying for higher corporate taxes.
Companies take jobs overseas to avoid US labor costs, mostly. There is no tax rate low enough to make US employees attractive when Chinese workers can do the job for $1.50 an hour.
Wrong... To reduce 'Total Cost' not simply labor cost.... For instance If it became too expensive to ship products back they would employ american workers instead to save money. We are actually seeing some of that now in the manufacturing sector as the price of oil goes up.
6/25/2014 1:11 PM
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 12:58:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 12:33:00 PM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 12:16:00 PM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 11:45:00 AM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 11:31:00 AM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 10:39:00 AM (view original):
Posted by moy23 on 6/25/2014 10:34:00 AM (view original):
Posted by bad_luck on 6/25/2014 9:24:00 AM (view original):
What about b2b sales? If I sell a component piece to a company that makes a product, do they pay a tax on that component?
No. Only the end user pays taxes when the good or service is bought.

The thought is it will reduce the cost of producing goods because they don't get taxed 15 times along the way.... And through competition drive the end price down which offsets the 23% sales tax for the consumer.


The FAQ has all of this in it. Its a really good tax system.... Its fair and best of all its simple.
So if I run a small construction company and buy a truck, no sales tax?
From the FAQ.... The answer is no sales tax for the business. See below.



Does the FairTax tax used items?

The FairTax does not tax "used" goods but it is important to note that HR25 has a legal definition of the term "used". This is necessary to ensure that items are taxed only once and to prevent tax cheating.

Under the FairTax, for an item to be considered "used" it must be:

(1) purchased before the FairTax is enacted, or

(2) the FairTax on the item must have been previously paid.

Let's look at (1) above. Assume that Joe bought a new car in January of 2012. Let's further assume that the FairTax went into effect on Jan. 1, 2013. Since Joe owned the car before the enactment of the FairTax, it is considered a "used" car. It has the taxes from the existing tax system embedded in its price. Therefore, when Joe sells that car to Bill, Bill will not owe tax on the transaction.

Now, let's consider (2) above. The most common example is that Joe buys a new car for personal use and pays the FairTax on it. If Joe then sells his car to Bill, there would be no tax on it because the tax had already been paid. Let's look at another example. Assume that Joe owns a flower shop business and buys a van to use when making deliveries to his customers. No tax is charged on purchases for business purposes so that the FairTax on goods sold to consumers does not double tax, or put a tax on a tax.

If Joe decides to sell the van to his friend Bill (who is not in business) for use as his personal vehicle, then it would be a taxable sale to Bill. Why? Because Joe did not pay tax when he bought the van for his flower shop. Since no FairTax has been previously paid on that van, it is not considered used and the sale to Bill would be taxable.

If later, Bill decided he did not like driving a van and sold it to someone else, it would not be a taxable sale. Why? Because the tax had been previously paid (when Bill bought it from Joe) making the item "used"; and not subject to tax.
Sounds like a cluster ****.

Since you're such a fan of "read the website," check this out:

www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2008/jan/23/adding-fairtax/
Point 1.... I'm not fixated on screwing the rich like some people are. The fair tax taxes everyone equally if they choose to buy something. The wealthy still spend more $$$ than the poor thus they will still pay a higher % of the tax burden. In some cases like cigarettes the current 50% sales taxes will drop to 23% which will help the 28% of those in poverty that smoke to have more spendable money. The prebate is a nice addition and its simple.

Point 2.... Their will always be black markets. Right now I can gamble online even though its illegal. I can buy drugs and guns pretty easily. I also can buy things online and skip sales tax. The good news is those IRS agents out of jobs under a fair tax can find a job trying to close these markets. This is probably the biggest drawback to the Fair Tax. The good outweighs the bad IMO.... And if people are doing things illegally I hope they are prosecuted for it.

Point 3... Of course it's a political nightmare... At first. Its a big change and most people fear change. Retirees will get over it. For one it repairs the social security system which is bankrupt.... For 2 they will no longer be taxed on SSI, Pension, IRA incomes. They will have more money... And possibly a prebate too. I'm sure lobbyists will be ****** too... They can't lobby for tax loopholes anymore.

The FAQ addresses a lot of these issues.... Like social security and mortgage interest deductions.
1) 23% is a big tax increase for almost everyone. Most people with middle class incomes only pay between 10% and 15% in Federal Taxes. The poor pay between 0% and 10%, usually. You not fixated on screwing the rich. You're fixated on screwing the poor and middle classes.

2) Arguing that people will find a way around a law is a terrible argument against a law. On the other hand, the way around this law is simple and legal. Buy used whenever possible. I think this would drive revenue down and force the tax rate to go up even more.

3) It's an everything nightmare.

 - It's not simpler, it's convoluted and difficult to enforce.
 - It raises taxes for the vast majority of the population.
 - It lowers taxes for people who can actually afford to pay high taxes. 

The fair tax is a scam, thought up by rich people who don't like paying a lot of taxes. It's packaged with the word "fair" and sold to idiots who are convinced that they too will one day be millionaires.
1) no they pay 15% on federal taxes PLUS 7% on sales taxes so a 23% sales tax is a wash.

2) is buying used a bad thing? It saves money, it's better for the environment, right?

3) Lol... How I it NOT simpler than the 2000 tax forms we currently have today. I'm shocked . we only have to ENFORCE it on businesses which we already do since they CURRENTLY pay collected sales taxes... That in and of itself is not a change at all from what is currently enforced.... BUT we would no longer need to enforce the 85 million families that file taxes every year which saves a ton of money, time, and opportunity for tax payers to defraud the system. It IS simpler to enforce AND reduces fraud risk.
1) That's still an increase for the vast majority of the population and a big decrease for the upper class.

2) Nothing wrong with buying used, but if government revenue is predicated on people buying new and there's suddenly a huge incentive to buy used, it seems like there could be a problem.

3) Most people have to file just one or two forms. Taxes are fairly simple for most people already.
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