All Forums > SimLeague Baseball > MLB > MLB: a bag of a**holes.
5/29/2014 5:41 PM
Posted by burnsy483 on 5/29/2014 11:38:00 AM (view original):
What a moron, right? Horrible.

m.mlb.com/video/v33221515/detoak-cabrera-blasts-solo-homer-off-gray/
Exactly.   Cabrera uses his 2nd shortest stride (He has 3 different ones depending on pitcher and situation) and still hits a home run.  He shortened his stride to increase contact with 2 strikes and hit a home run
5/29/2014 5:48 PM
No ****.  And we're talking about the best RH hitter in baseball.   "Rules" don't apply to him any more than they did to Ted Williams.   If guys like Cabrera want to stand on their head and swing at balls at their feet, let them.    Just don't say "Look at Cabrera.   He did this and hit a homer!!!"
5/29/2014 10:29 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 5/29/2014 5:36:00 PM (view original):
Posted by burnsy483 on 5/29/2014 4:12:00 PM (view original):
Chris Davis had a fantastic year, finished 3rd in MVP voting.  Adam Dunn will probably hit 500+ homers.  Ryan Howard was great in that time period - he won an MVP.  You make it sound like striking out is a good thing.
Dave Kingman hit 400 homers when 400 homers was fanfuckingtastic.    Great player?
Dunn's career OBP is 65 points better than Kingman's.  Career .367 OBP, .494 SLG, 124 OPS+ is maybe not great, but it's pretty damn good, even for a guy who can't field.  Especially if it does include the service time to have, so far, 448 HRs.

Career for Kingman is a .302 OBP and .478 SLG, 115 OPS+.  Given that OBP is at least 60 or 65% more valuable than SLG, that's a pretty huge difference.  I think Kingman gets underrated now because of all the statnerds pointing to how overrated he was in his day, and before that just from the discussions erupting from his being the first 400 HR guy to miss the HOF.  Dude like that, in a lower HR environment than what followed, was a valuable player.  Probably should bat no higher than 6th or 7th because of the OBP, but still can provide a lot of value in that spot.
5/30/2014 7:01 AM
Dave Kingman is what we refer to as a one-trick pony. 
5/30/2014 1:06 PM
Dave Kingman was just slightly above average because he couldn't make enough contact to avoid being out 70% of the time.
5/30/2014 1:55 PM
Most hitters are out 70% of the time.

Less, if they make contact.
5/30/2014 2:06 PM
Posted by tecwrg on 5/30/2014 1:55:00 PM (view original):
Most hitters are out 70% of the time.

Less, if they make contact.
?

No, on average, major league hitters are out about 68% percent of the time. That 2-3% is a big difference. And good hitters are usually out between 60% and 66% of the time.
6/3/2014 12:41 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 5/12/2014 10:24:00 PM (view original):
It's silly to ask "Was the game that much different".     Look at the stats.    Now, of course, you can look at eras and see how "the game was that much different" in the 60s or 70s.   Or 20s/30s.   Yes, it is/was "that much different".     Nonetheless, I think there's a disturbing trend in the new today's game that might need to be "fixed".     1 in 5 AB ends in a strikeout.   Whiffs have been on the rise since tougher PED laws were put in place.   While statnerds may say "An out's an out", a whiff is also two guys playing catch to the casual fan.    People won't pay to watch a game of catch. 
I think Colin Cowherd read this.   He's making the same point right now.   Which, if he had said it first, would make me feel dirty. 
6/3/2014 10:25 PM
Good point, though there have been articles in the press since last season about how the increasing K rate will eventually cost MLB fans, so neither you nor Colin get originality points.  Pitchers throwing harder and the increased use of relief pitchers probably has more to do with the higher K rate then tougher PED laws. 

Not sure what MLB can do about it without making a huge fundamental change in the rules (foul balls with 0 -1 strikes count as no pitch instead of a strike?, probably not happening).  Could lower the mound again, or wait for every pitcher who throws over 92 mph to have TJ surgery.

6/3/2014 10:30 PM
Baseball is doing just fine...DON'T F WITH IT...unless you're making the DH universal.
6/3/2014 10:57 PM
Baseball fans in their 40s don't count.   We've been fans for 20, 30, 40 years(45 for me).   We're going to watch 1-0 and 11-9 games.   But the simple fact of the matter is every sport(excluding soccer and it's non-popularity in the US) has taken steps to increase scoring.  If you don't know why, I can't help you. 
6/4/2014 4:22 PM
Posted by mountainjack on 6/3/2014 10:25:00 PM (view original):
Good point, though there have been articles in the press since last season about how the increasing K rate will eventually cost MLB fans, so neither you nor Colin get originality points.  Pitchers throwing harder and the increased use of relief pitchers probably has more to do with the higher K rate then tougher PED laws. 

Not sure what MLB can do about it without making a huge fundamental change in the rules (foul balls with 0 -1 strikes count as no pitch instead of a strike?, probably not happening).  Could lower the mound again, or wait for every pitcher who throws over 92 mph to have TJ surgery.

Lowering the mound is probably a realistic option to solving the pitcher vs hitter imbalance. Adding a DH to the NL would also help. 
6/16/2014 8:21 PM

Getting back on topic:

6/17/2014 12:37 AM
Do you have a picture of him cashing a huge check from the Yankees for his 2015, 2016, and 2017 cards?
6/17/2014 5:52 AM
No.  Do you?
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