All Forums > SimLeague Baseball > MLB > A-Rod: Next Yankee SS?
8/31/2013 1:02 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 8/31/2013 7:15:00 AM (view original):
Posted by winner77 on 8/30/2013 11:05:00 PM (view original):
Posted by MikeT23 on 8/30/2013 11:01:00 PM (view original):
That's what 'roids do.  You can't take a shot of 'roids in the ***, sit around eating ice cream and then bench a Yugo.   You HAVE to work out.    In truth, HGH is probably "worse" than 'roids because you get the same benefit without the 23 lb liver when you're 60.
Well, the sheer size difference is notable, no?  How many current players look like Sosa, Bonds, McGwire....they were all like 245+ pounds.  That extra weight made their bat speed soar. That has been the argument for years that the size is what produced the extra power.
Size and strength aren't the same thing. 
The more size you have, the stronger you can get.  Also creates a lot of leverage.  A 245 pound guy who lifts weights a lot is going to have more raw power than a 205 pound guy that works out the same amount.
8/31/2013 2:35 PM
This guy can probably bench a house, right?

8/31/2013 4:51 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 8/31/2013 2:35:00 PM (view original):
This guy can probably bench a house, right?

my phone screen is too small. is that magic johnson? cheeseburgers in the 'roid category?

yes. common knowledge that a double-wide can bench a single wide. but pretty rare, a double-wide benching a double wide.

saw it on pbs. a hometime episode where bob vila went to kansas to help tornado victims re-build. pretty rare, indeed.

'roids did that, huh? oh my.
8/31/2013 9:17 PM
Posted by lad_buck on 8/31/2013 4:51:00 PM (view original):
Posted by MikeT23 on 8/31/2013 2:35:00 PM (view original):
This guy can probably bench a house, right?

my phone screen is too small. is that magic johnson? cheeseburgers in the 'roid category?

yes. common knowledge that a double-wide can bench a single wide. but pretty rare, a double-wide benching a double wide.

saw it on pbs. a hometime episode where bob vila went to kansas to help tornado victims re-build. pretty rare, indeed.

'roids did that, huh? oh my.
All I know is the huge guys were hitting popups that landed 3 rows deep.  We don't see that hugeness anymore.  I SAID you DO have to work out.  The guy above is obese, not muscles up.  Good grief.
9/1/2013 7:14 AM
But he's got good size.   I thought size = raw power?

9/1/2013 10:57 AM
Size = power. That's why small guys like this are nothing more than slap hit singles hitters.


And big guys hit like this hit 40 homers a season.


9/1/2013 9:08 PM (edited)
baseball-reference.com, on friday, finally created and released an entire section of the most comprehensive database that i have ever seen, concerning the japan leagues, way back into the 1950's.

if size=power, then why does a player with only 2 letters in his last name, have almost 900 homeruns in his career? just proverbially posing this absurd question as an anecdote, since people were hitting homeruns long before supplements were mistaken as a way to increase power.

oh?

the same stick as aaron had in the batter's box, and pitchers still in power with speeds in the upper 90's, even in the ninth. just alot of sushi between games, is about the only thing that aaron did not have in common, with his overseas rival.

oh?

never had the benefit of the international relationships that exist today, allowing players from the entire globe to pervade mlb rosters. yet time and time again, even aaron acknowledged that the japanese slugger would have done the same, even better, in america.

oh?

if the only similarity detecting the bloating size of barry's neck, and baseballs hit into a bay full of waiting boats of all varieties, then mlb will never find a solution to this prob, as it just refuses to look in the right place, as long as the stack of money is bigger than barry's neck.

oh? so u think so?
9/1/2013 9:07 PM (edited)
before, espn steered everyone (with espn agenda) to the tiny island nation producing mlb regulation baseballs. at the dawn, the early espn-investigative reporters uncovering steroid use, never once mentioned steroids in two solid years of top-notch reporting. all the numbers added-up to the nation of haiti.

there was a time in baseball, that created ruth-like numbers. it was ruth, solely. steroid science did not create the babe. someone surpassed ruths homerun totals with batting averages that do not compare well against those of ruth. there are some severe differences in how both of these homerun hitters came to prominence with debates designed to never end.

what really emerges foremost, to the lifelong love of numbers, and the game of baseball, is some basic awe at ruth and aaron. their social network was newspaper & radio-media driven. just like today, with turnstiles recording the "likes" of the today crowd. 

the american media could never portray sadaharu oh. it sure was not steered in that direction by its agenda. took awhile for america to get used to even the word "japan". the answer, comparing ruth and aaron, is made in japan. 130-game seasons, with end-of-season homerun tallies that took ruth 154 games to equal. batting averages that resemble aarons. nobody wanted to pitch to him, more respectfully than trying to avoid babes bat.

sadaharu oh played 22 seasons as both ruth and aaron in one package. at age 22, he began a 19 consecutive year run of 30 or more homeruns. very aaron. like every slugger, its always nice when u have more than one season with an OBP at .500, or better. very ruth. AB totals in the mid-400's, but multiple seasons of more than 50 homeruns. with pitchers again not pitching to him, his walk totals are so very ruth-like. this guy might hit hobbs, finally.

slugging percentage in jaw-dropping abundance for two decades. OPS numbers rock-solid above the famed 1.000, over a span of time that would take a child at birth, and follow him thru his first year in high school. sadaharu oh was there the whole time, in those numbers now available at baseball-reference.com.

and without PED's.

in his last season, at age forty, he retired with his last season ever, hitting 30 or more homeruns, in a 130 game season.
 
9/1/2013 8:34 PM (edited)
oh's 22-season career produced 868 homeruns in 2,831 games. a career batting avg. of .301, and a career .446 OBP. his career OPS is 1.080, and in those 2,831 games, he amassed an astonishing 5,862 total bases. those japan leagues had their hideo and yu strikeout pitchers. all this with the lone strategy of not pitching to him, or giving him anything he could hit. all this from a batter who played his whole career with one team.

oh's single season career highs and bests are equally as entertaining. 55 homers in 472 AB's, 51 homers in 428 AB's, and 50 homers in 432 AB's in that Tokyo home stadium for half his games. single season OPS's descending as 1.293, 1.255, 1.211, 1.210, 1.204, 1.197, 1.189, 1.183, and 1.176.

114 runs scored in 130 games / 124 rbis in 130 games / 9 seasons with a slugging % over .700 / 14 seasons with a slugging % over .600 / a single season high batting avg. of .355 / his strikeout totals are miniscule compared to all sluggers we know. his career total of 2,831 games produced only 1,319 strikeouts. his worst years, swinging and missing, were in his early twenties. he adjusted, and put the bat to the ball for the remaining 75% of his career.
 
in his prime, his early thirties, oh struck out less than 10% of his at bats. 41 times in 428 AB's, 43 times in 456 AB's, 37 times in 432 AB's, and 43 times in 440 AB's.

this is what a slugger does with a bat. without PED's. no arguing allowed. no arod. no bonds. they could have done this another way. any other way. the asterisk is the biggest digit in the numbers they gathered thru their careers. sadaharu oh is the greater slugger here. and opinionatedly so.
9/1/2013 9:01 PM
sadaharu oh retired from managing japanese professional baseball teams in 2008, for 19 seasons, with a career winning % of .540. he is 73 yrs. old. a left-handed first-baseman, who played only 2 games in the outfield, in 22 seasons.
9/1/2013 11:15 PM
Posted by MikeT23 on 8/31/2013 2:35:00 PM (view original):
This guy can probably bench a house, right?

sadaharu oh is listed at 5 ft., 10 inches tall, weighing 173 pounds.
9/5/2013 5:28 PM
From what most of you guys say, we can probably safely say roids did not help, and so we should ignore them.  I mean, the fact that McGwire was 260 pounds, Sosa was 245, Bonds was 240....heck, who cares? 

Cool, roids are fine.  Being huge/muscled up guy does not help with power.  We can all move on.  Great.

9/5/2013 5:34 PM
There are guys throughout history who had great power, but were not huge.  Mays, Aaron, Ted Williams, Griffey.....they are the TRUE home run hitters.  When you look at what McGwire did, and how he changed his body so much, it's obvious he was going to mis-hit balls and STILL get them over the fence.  Same with Sosa.  Same with Bonds. 
9/5/2013 5:51 PM
Posted by lad_buck on 9/1/2013 9:01:00 PM (view original):
sadaharu oh retired from managing japanese professional baseball teams in 2008, for 19 seasons, with a career winning % of .540. he is 73 yrs. old. a left-handed first-baseman, who played only 2 games in the outfield, in 22 seasons.
His record of 55 home runs has been challenged by some ALL TIME greats.  Tuffy Rhodes!  Kevin Bass!  Alex Cabrera!!!

Sigh, gimmie a break with the Oh crap.

9/5/2013 5:55 PM
Seriously. Congrats Oh, you're the AAA equivalent home run king.
of 45
All Forums > SimLeague Baseball > MLB > A-Rod: Next Yankee SS?

Terms of Use Customer Support Privacy Statement

Popular on WhatIfSports site: Baseball Simulation | College Basketball Game | College Football Game | Online Baseball Game | Hockey Simulation | NFL Picks | College Football Picks | Sports Games

© 1999-2014 WhatIfSports.com, Inc. All rights reserved. WhatIfSports is a trademark of WhatIfSports.com, Inc. SimLeague, SimMatchup and iSimNow are trademarks or registered trademarks of Electronic Arts, Inc. Used under license. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.