3/16/2013 4:41 PM
Anyone have suggestions on a good way to calculate effective pitch counts based on durability/stamina ?
3/16/2013 6:25 PM
Start with the recommendations and adjust up or down based on your observations as the season progresses.
3/16/2013 10:25 PM
OK thanks...that's sorta what I had been doing, but I wasn't sure if there was a more mathematical method that could produce better results.
3/17/2013 10:16 AM
I am not sure this is what you are asking but I was taught to take stamina and multiply it times 1.3 to get max pitch count. I usually set the target 5 below the max or if I need a guy to push it I will set it at max.  I guess key games against division foes(or wild card race foes) I would want my best relief pitchers available so maybe plan accordingly?  After reading the message board most players put all of their relievers at setup A and let skipper decide who comes in to close the games. So many times a guy will be available to pitch 2 innings of shutout ball instead of setting him as the closer and not getting the max out of him. I am pretty new to this too so anything I am saying is totally wrong please correct me.
3/17/2013 12:15 PM
That is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for in terms of pitch counts...as for strategy, I think I've got a system pretty well worked out, but thanks for the ip
3/18/2013 10:47 AM
Stam x 1.3. You'll notice that the recomended target counts usually match up pretty well with that.
3/18/2013 10:50 AM
If the pitcher's durability is around 20 or so, you may find that Stam x 1.3 may be too high.
3/19/2013 8:27 PM
1.3? What about in game fatigue?
3/19/2013 9:18 PM
I read on here once to get the "rec" for 6 starters then apply those numbers +/- 5 to the 5 guys you use. That works out pretty well, I think. 
3/19/2013 11:03 PM
Stam x 1.3 is the number of pitches he can throw before experiencing in game fatigue. I'm pretty confident that PC works on a linear scale, so that formula works regardless of whether his stamina is 5 or 95. If you go lower than what that formula gives you, you're wasting innings.

Unlike SLB, HBD pitchers need to pitch as soon as they hit 100% and their max pitches every outing if you want to maximize their innings.
3/20/2013 11:44 AM

If your referring to relief pitchers, I tend to run mine about (setup guys) about 5 to 10 pitches below stamina depending on durability.  For example a 75 / 35 durability guy I would set at a max of 30 pitches, with a target around 20.  I've found that they rarely fatigue.  For long relief pitchers I do use the durability more as a guide, if a guy has a 50 stamina, but only a 25 durability I would cap him at about 30 pitches with an target of 25, he'll miss a day here and there but can give you an inning or two.  If his durability was in the 40's or higher, I'd likely top him out at 40 max.  For relievers I never exceed the stamina number with a max pitch count.

For starters the thing I've noticed, and tec or mike correct me if i'm wrong but all X pitch counts for starters aren't created equal.  Say a pitcher throws a nice 110 pitch 8 inning start only gives up a run a couple hits and a walk or two, in my experience his stamina will drop to the 40 to 50% range and then start the recovery process, however if that same pitcher throws the same number of pitches but doesn't get past the 5th inning and gives up several hits / runs, then his stamina is markedly lower even with the same pitch count.

3/20/2013 11:50 AM
I actually do the opposite of what todd stated - if I have a 70 DUR/30 STM guy I'll probably push him to 30 pitches an outing if he's good. 

I think the second point is also inaccurate - a pitch is a pitch.

3/20/2013 11:53 AM
However, you will find that there are times when a pitcher who starts at 100% won't faitgue at the same rates.  The reasoning is how much rest they got before each start.  If a pitcher was at 85(100) the game before, he will fatigue much quicker than if he were at 100 the game before.  
3/20/2013 12:05 PM
A pitch thrown is a pitch thrown.
3/20/2013 12:12 PM
Posted by burnsy483 on 3/20/2013 11:53:00 AM (view original):
However, you will find that there are times when a pitcher who starts at 100% won't faitgue at the same rates.  The reasoning is how much rest they got before each start.  If a pitcher was at 85(100) the game before, he will fatigue much quicker than if he were at 100 the game before.  
This is the correct answer to what todd has experienced.  Fatigue actually goes above 100% (and below 0%), though you can only see the 0-100% range.

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